China, Russia Advancing Anti-Satellite Technology, US Intelligence Chief Says

By Leonard David, Space.com's Space Insider Columnist | May 18, 2017 07:00am ET
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Space is regarded as the "the ultimate high ground" in military engagements. Credit: US Air Force
The United States' top intelligence official spotlighted the threat of space warfare in a hearing of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence last week.

Mars' Raindrops May Once Have Been Bigger Than Earth's

By Mike Wall, Space.com Senior Writer | May 18, 2017 07:30am ET
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This image by NASA's Mars rover Curiosity shows very fine-grained sediments, which fell down through the water of a lake that existed inside the Red Planet's Gale Crater billions of years ago Credit: NASA
Billions of years ago, rain on Mars was heavy enough to shape the planet's surface, carving channels into the red dirt and washing away parts of impact craters, new research suggests.

в─≤Alien megastructuresв─≥ orbiting 64 nearby stars may be VISIBLE from Earth, astronomer says

ALIEN megastructures orbiting 64 nearby stars could be visible from Earth with todayв─(tm)s technology, a leading physicist has claimed.
By Nicole Stinson
NASA/GETTYAlien megastructures may surround up to 64 stars neighbouring Earth
Two years ago astronomers discovered a star, known as KIC 8462852 or Tabby's Star, which mysteriously brightened and dimmed.
The phenomenon baffled experts and several theories emerged including one

Here's What Scientists Have Learned From Total Solar Eclipses

By Nola Taylor Redd, Space.com Contributor | May 17, 2017 03:45pm ET
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NASA's SOHO spacecraft can study the atmospheric layers of the sun that extend off its central body. Total solar eclipses gave humans the first opportunity to see this region of Earth's nearest star. Credit: ESA/NASA/SOHO
Throughout human history, scientists have used the awe-inspiring event of a total solar eclipse to hunt for new information about the world not easily available through other means.

Human-Made Radio Bubble Shields Earth from Radiation | Video

By SPACE.com Staff | May 17, 2017 04:48pm ET
Powerful, low-frequency radio waves used to communicate with submarines also beam out from Earth, interacting with particles in space and forming a protective bubble against high-energy particle radiation, new research suggests.
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A Cubesat Packed with Cremated Remains Slotted for SpaceX Rideshare Mission

By Debra Werner, SpaceNews | May 17, 2017 04:00pm ET
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Elysium customers receive a smartphone application they can share with family and friends to track the cubesat, which is expected to remain in a sun-synchronous low-Earth for about two-years. Credit: Elysium

Cold-War Era Blasts Impacted Space Weather | Video

By SPACE.com Staff | May 17, 2017 04:38pm ET
According to recently declassified data, U.S. and Soviet high-altitude nuclear explosion tests from 1958 to 1962 caused space weather effects more usually sparked by the sun's activity - like auroras at the equator, strain on utility grids and satellite malfunctions.
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Seth McFarlane Is Headed to Space with 'The Orville' on Fox

By Tariq Malik, Space.com Managing Editor | May 17, 2017 03:00pm ET
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Seth MacFarlane is gearing up for a trek across the final frontier.
Fox announced this week that it will launch a new science fiction TV series "The Orville" this fall starring funnyman executive producer and actor MacFarlane ("Family Guy," "Ted") as the commander of the titular starship. Adrianne Palicki (of "Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.") will portray MacFarlane's

Antikythera Anniversary: Astronomical Computer Still Puzzles After 115 Years

By Jeanna Bryner, LiveScience Managing Editor | May 17, 2017 12:46pm ET
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Credit: Google
What looked like a hunk of corroded metal lying at the bottom of the Aegean Sea near the Greek island of Antikythera turned out to be a piece of a mysterious astronomical calculator. That was 115 years ago, on May 17, 1902, when archaeologist Valerios Stais discovered the bronze bit among other artifacts discovered on the Roman cargo ship called the Antikythera shipwreck.

'Truly Chilling': US Satellites Vulnerable to Enemy Attack, Ted Cruz Says

By Mike Wall, Space.com Senior Writer | May 17, 2017 01:30pm ET
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Space junk created by a 2007 Chinese anti-satellite test hit a Russian satellite on Jan. 22, 2013. Credit: Courtesy of Analytical Graphics, Inc.
The United States' critical satellite infrastructure is vulnerable to attack by increasingly capable adversaries, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, warned yesterday.

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